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Neuropsychological Evaluation?

neuropsychology neurology diagnosis

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#1 jessica

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Posted 20 September 2011 - 07:38 AM

So, my current doctor, after deciding she didn't know what the hell to make of me, asked me to get a neuropsychological evaluation. I'm scheduled for one in a month or so.

I've been through them with my daughter, who has a very mild case of PDD (autism-like but not quite), but I have a feeling that my "learning style" and my ability to identify patterns aren't going to be in it.

Has anyone else been through them as an adult with psychiatric issues? I'm guessing that I'm going to be going through the MMPI at least, but other than that, I have no idea what they're going to do with me. My intelligence is high-normal (I'm a member of Mensa — whether I have any common sense is a separate issue) so I don't see why they'd do more than cursory testing of that. They do want to know what sort of personality disorder I have and to what extent I'm mentally hampered by Asperger's. (I'm not sure Asperger's even exists, but whatever. I don't know why I can't just be eccentric yet stoic. However, if they want labels, more power to 'em.)

I know the usual advice is to ask your doctor, but she's not doing the testing and isn't familiar with the procedure at McLean yet, and the doctor who is doing the testing doesn't call back. (Doesn't bother me, it's the same hospital and the analysis is mostly going to be of tests I take, I'm fairly sure, rather than any diagnostic interviews.)

But I'd like to know what tests I'm looking forward to, or at least have some good guesses.

Anyone? Anyone? Bueller? Bueller?
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#2 martasi2

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Posted 20 September 2011 - 11:04 AM

Testing often takes a long time - 4-6 hours isn't uncommon. There are so many tests to choose from, and tests are chosen based upon what your doctor is looking for or trying to rule out. Or just to get more information upon which to base a clinical diagnosis. There isn't necessarily a standard test or group of tests for each patient. It also takes a skilled clinician to know how to interpret test results and look for patterns that indicate certain conditions or diagnoses. If your doctor is looking for evidence of personality disorders, you probably won't get tests to measure learning disabilities - unless there is some reason to look in this area.

Neuropsych testing is expensive. Not all insurance policies cover it, so your co-pay (or total cost) could be quite high. You might need pre-approval from your insurance company. It's better to know this in advance than after the fact.

The tests may not give a definite diagnosis. You may get general information such as there's a pattern of depressed thinking or paranoia, or your answers are consistent with such-and-such a personality type, but the testing can't definitely say whether you have Bipolar II, for instance. Test results may be just one more piece of the puzzle.
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#3 dymphna

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Posted 21 September 2011 - 02:05 AM

So, my current doctor, after deciding she didn't know what the hell to make of me, asked me to get a neuropsychological evaluation. I'm scheduled for one in a month or so.

I've been through them with my daughter, who has a very mild case of PDD (autism-like but not quite), but I have a feeling that my "learning style" and my ability to identify patterns aren't going to be in it.


Don't assume.

The Abstract/Visual Reasoning area score examines the ability to interpret and perform mathematic operations, the ability to visualize patterns, visual/motor skills, and problem-solving skills through the use of reasoning. An example of a subtest which determines the Abstract/Visual Reasoning score is a timed test that involves tasks such as completing a basic puzzle and replicating black and white cube designs.

Read more: Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale - children, functioning, adults, examples, person, used, score, skills, Definition http://www.minddisor...l#ixzz1YZbeKRqy


I remember sitting there with those damn cubes and they may as well have been upper division calculus. I simply could NOT visualize how to turn them to make the stupid patterns. Which is funny, because I can bumble my way through damn near any language, and all that is is patterning. I sat there FOREVER, and still the nimrod said "that is excellent". Right, buddy.

Has anyone else been through them as an adult with psychiatric issues? I'm guessing that I'm going to be going through the MMPI at least, but other than that, I have no idea what they're going to do with me. My intelligence is high-normal (I'm a member of Mensa — whether I have any common sense is a separate issue) so I don't see why they'd do more than cursory testing of that. They do want to know what sort of personality disorder I have and to what extent I'm mentally hampered by Asperger's. (I'm not sure Asperger's even exists, but whatever. I don't know why I can't just be eccentric yet stoic. However, if they want labels, more power to 'em.)


Word to the wise on the MMPI - and this is going to sound so obvious, don't laugh - answer only the questions that APPLY to you, not the questions you know the ANSWER to.

By the time my test results came back, everyone was scooting away from me like I belonged on the Group W bench. Even the neurologist who ordered the test wouldn't come within 3 feet of me. I honestly couldn't understand what was going on until I brought it to my Pdoc to read and he burst out laughing. Apparently, they had slapped me with just about the entire DSM, because I'd answered the test with what I knew (and y'all know I know ALOT). And, like you, I'm wicked smart. I also have almost complete recall. So all of the little fail safes that are written into the MMPI to make sure a person isn't "gaming" it - well, I was consistent in my answers. I wasn't gaming it, I was just consistent in what I "knew".

As to the ASD component, from the time I was little, I was put in the "you're weird, but gifted" classes, but no one was tested for Aspergers back then where I lived. As an adult, all of my spectrum friends say "Duh", but I don't test that way because I've had my entire life to learn how to "fake it". I took a test a couple of years ago thinking back to how I reacted to life at say, age 10, and I was off the charts. But today? You really only see it if I'm tired, frustrated, or in new social situations. I agree with my last Pdoc - what would be the purpose in another Dx at this point in my life?

But I'd like to know what tests I'm looking forward to, or at least have some good guesses.

Anyone? Anyone? Bueller? Bueller?


MMPI
Close your eyes and smell different substances
Tell the doc when you stop hearing the ringing of the harmonic thing held up to each ear
You're told three unrelated words at the beginning of the session and will be asked them at the end (not as easy as it sounds)
Adding simple numbers
What letter comes before or after (sequencing)
Faces (did you see this one before in the book -- AAARRRRGGG!!)
Patterns, patterns, patterns - is this one the same as this one? Is this the opposite?
Please write this sentence
We're just going to sit down and have a little chat (I call this the BPD interview). Anyone die in your family? How was your relationship before they died? How did you deal with their death? Anyone divorce? How did that affect you? Describe your relationship with your family. Describe your relationship with your spouse. When did you leave home? What did you do? You went to college? How was that experience? Have you ever been diagnosed with anything?

-- Now, I'm going to stop here and say something. If I knew then what I knew now, that entire interview would have gone very differently. I can see in retrospect that the questions were set up to elicit a particular diagnosis - one that fit the model the neurologist already had in mind for me (hence the Pdoc laughing his ass off at the report). I'm not going to advocate that anyone ever lie to an interviewer, as we all know that lying isn't a good way to get proper treatment. However. A neuropsych is not a primary care psychiatric practitioner. They are a SME - a subject matter expert. They provide tests, observations, etc., and if they are very good, come up with a proper bundle of information from which a Pdoc may base treatment. If they are lousy, they can plant a big-ass red "A" on the chest of a patient that may prevent them from getting appropriate treatment - possibly for the rest of their life.

--So. You say that they "want to know what kind of personality disorder you have." Um, what? Why are they starting with the presumption that you have one? Scientifically, they should be sending you off to "see what is going on in your head", NOT to have you spend two days of testing to have someone sign off on their thesis. If they want you to have this testing done, fine. Go somewhere else to have it done - not to "their" provider. Go to someone who doesn't even know them. That is the only way you will get a truly objective view of what is going on. (and this isn't just my experience - I have encountered many people go through this with their kids as well)

/rant

d
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Yes, my name really is Dymphna.

 

I'm not a doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or therapist.

I can find you an answer and I won't blow smoke up your ass.

 

St. Dymphna is the Patron for brain maladies.

 

I'm the Enforcer.

 

eqnmrt.jpg

 


#4 Jerod Poore

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Posted 21 September 2011 - 02:11 PM

Has anyone else been through them as an adult with psychiatric issues?

I've had two so far.

I'm guessing that I'm going to be going through the MMPI at least, but other than that, I have no idea what they're going to do with me.

I've taken the MMPI, but not for the neuropsych tests.

My intelligence is high-normal (I'm a member of Mensa — whether I have any common sense is a separate issue) so I don't see why they'd do more than cursory testing of that.

Bets? How many animals can you name that start with the letter C. You have 2 minutes. Extra credit for listing them in alphabetical order.

They do want to know what sort of personality disorder I have and to what extent I'm mentally hampered by Asperger's. (I'm not sure Asperger's even exists, but whatever. I don't know why I can't just be eccentric yet stoic. However, if they want labels, more power to 'em.)

I don't know how they conclude I have Asperger's in the first one, but in the second one they voted me off of Asperger's Island because I have practically no visual memory. Plus Trileptal had been messing with me, so I should have rescheduled.

But I'd like to know what tests I'm looking forward to, or at least have some good guesses.

The Wikipedia article lists a bunch of tests. Some I've taken, some I haven't, and I have no idea if the ones without descriptions are ones I've taken or not.
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#5 Jerod Poore

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Posted 21 September 2011 - 02:18 PM

Close your eyes and smell different substances
Tell the doc when you stop hearing the ringing of the harmonic thing held up to each ear

I had entire roadside DUI epilepsy test. Touching my nose, walking a straight line, grabbing the testers' fingers, balancing on one foot, etc.

You're told three unrelated words at the beginning of the session and will be asked them at the end (not as easy as it sounds)

Really? I remembered those for months.
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#6 VAL

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Posted 21 September 2011 - 02:56 PM

Dymphna,

Word to the wise on the MMPI - and this is going to sound so obvious, don't laugh - answer only the questions that APPLY to you, not the questions you know the ANSWER to.


So all of the little fail safes that are written into the MMPI to make sure a person isn't "gaming" it - well, I was consistent in my answers. I wasn't gaming it, I was just consistent in what I "knew".


Can you give an example of a question that would demonstrate how you would differentiate between what "applies" to you and what you "know"? I'm a little confused.

I don't know if I ever took the MMPI, but in the mid-late 80's a psychologist convinced my boss that it would be useful to test potential employees with a personality test (not as commonly done then as now) and it may have been the MMPI. All I know for sure is that one of the nuttier employees who I would describe as probably having a genius IQ, came out as the most desirable and I came out the least. ( she was also a graduate psychology student of some sort). Among other things, I supposedly didn't have much impulse control and was a potential thief, liar, etc.

Since my boss considered me to be one of the most honest people he'd ever met he immediately decided against using the test. I'm also an incredibly cautious person about many things and other than occasional impulsive purchases that at that time were never more extreme than, "I shouldn't have spent that $100 on that book", I think pretty carefully before I make decisions and have never had impulsive sex or shoplifted or anything even remotely similar.

In general, when I have occasionally taken a supposed "personality test" usually described as some version of the MMPI (online junk), I have a great deal of difficulty because it always seemed to me that there were too many subtle nuances in the potential answer that didn't jive with the choices as "most applicable to you" that I'd get sort of lost in how to answer.

I have zero ability with math, recognizing patterns whether numeric or shapes, understanding anything that remotely requires spatial reasoning and I can't come up with more than two animals that start with the letter "C" (using Jerod's example).

Another question that perhaps you can shed some light on. My memory is very poor and though there has been improvement since my depression has improved (once lamictal weirdness went away), it remains a serious problem for me. My pdoc wanted to have some basic testing done (I'm uninsured) and was going to ask his suite mate (he's is a PHD psychologist but I don't know exactly what his title would be) to perhaps have one of his PHD interns administer some tests for free...he said they swap favors like that occasionally. He never said anything about it at follow up visits and I never brought it up because I was so torn about the prospect of finding out exactly where I stood, but I'm beginning to wonder again if i should test and I have a little chunk of cash from the sale of a house. My question is whether or not a person can simply ring up a psychologist who specializes in that area and ask for testing?

Yes, i can ask my pdoc and may do so if it would be prohibitively expensive or not possible without a referral.
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#7 notfred

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Posted 21 September 2011 - 03:55 PM

"Sometimes I have queer thoughts", I love that one on the MMPI. Being gay I never know how to answer that one !

nf

Edited by notfred, 21 September 2011 - 04:41 PM.

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#8 Jerod Poore

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Posted 21 September 2011 - 04:23 PM

"Sometimes I have queer thoughts", I love that on on the MMPI. Being gay I never know how to answer that one !


HAH!

The MMPI is full of ambiguous questions, archaic language, and is so redundant that I gave up after a certain point.

Fun fact: $cientology's personality test is essentially the MMPI.
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#9 jessica

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 06:24 AM

Neuropsych testing is expensive. Not all insurance policies cover it, so your co-pay (or total cost) could be quite high. You might need pre-approval from your insurance company.


Yep, already checked that. The insurance company agreed to pay because I've had my short-term memory permanently shot by benzos.


I remember sitting there with those damn cubes and they may as well have been upper division calculus. I simply could NOT visualize how to turn them to make the stupid patterns. Which is funny, because I can bumble my way through damn near any language, and all that is is patterning.


Heh. I'm the same way (I've got a minimal command of at least six languages — English, French, German, Italian, Icelandic, Spanish) and I can't make the stupid dice match up either.

Word to the wise on the MMPI - and this is going to sound so obvious, don't laugh - answer only the questions that APPLY to you, not the questions you know the ANSWER to.


I've never had an M.M.P.I. before so I appreciate that thought. It never occurred to me that it'd freak them out if I answered everything, no matter how neutral.

From the time I was little, I was put in the "you're weird, but gifted" classes, but no one was tested for Aspergers back then where I lived. As an adult, all of my spectrum friends say "Duh", but I don't test that way because I've had my entire life to learn how to "fake it". I took a test a couple of years ago thinking back to how I reacted to life at say, age 10, and I was off the charts. But today? You really only see it if I'm tired, frustrated, or in new social situations. I agree with my last Pdoc - what would be the purpose in another Dx at this point in my life?


I just view Dx'es as simple information. I am conservative in what I'll allow for pharmacological treatment, but I don't mind giving a very complete picture to any treating psychiatrists, and I'm usually pretty flexible in what I'll allow for behavioural therapies. I was also that kid, but I had a Godsend — literally. I went to convent schools, where the curriculum hadn't changed since 1930 or so and the focus was on memorising and spitting back information. They didn't ask me to do group projects or new maths or anything like that. It was all about analysis, and none of the nuns cared that I spent recess reading a book rather than Socialising With My Fellow Students.

They are a SME - a subject matter expert. They provide tests, observations, etc., and if they are very good, come up with a proper bundle of information from which a Pdoc may base treatment.


That's really all we're looking for, data. It doesn't change my treatment plan.

You say that they "want to know what kind of personality disorder you have." Um, what? Why are they starting with the presumption that you have one?


Because dozens of diagnostic interviews over the years have strongly suggested I have one, and probably schizoid, but they're not sure and they want to differentiate between what degree is schizoid and what degree is Asperger's, since it's really on the same scale. They also want to rule out schizotypal or anything else, such as avoidant. I say in my .sig that I'm major depression, but lately, it's been mood disorder N.O.S., leaning toward major depression with current episode (which has been going on for about twelve years) severe. So they'd like to look at that if they can.


You're told three unrelated words at the beginning of the session and will be asked them at the end (not as easy as it sounds)

Really? I remembered those for months.


Yeah, I still remember the ones I got during my last intake for inpatient. Weird what our brains hold onto.


I'm also an incredibly cautious person about many things and other than occasional impulsive purchases that at that time were never more extreme than, "I shouldn't have spent that $100 on that book" …


It's a book. That's not impulsive, that's a bibliophile's dream. :mad:

Another question that perhaps you can shed some light on. My memory is very poor and though there has been improvement since my depression has improved (once lamictal weirdness went away), it remains a serious problem for me. My pdoc wanted to have some basic testing done (I'm uninsured) and was going to ask his suite mate (he's is a PHD psychologist but I don't know exactly what his title would be) to perhaps have one of his PHD interns administer some tests for free...he said they swap favors like that occasionally. My question is whether or not a person can simply ring up a psychologist who specializes in that area and ask for testing? Yes, i can ask my pdoc and may do so if it would be prohibitively expensive or not possible without a referral.


My insurance approved it because of irregular memory problems, so I think that's relatively common. If you're uninsured, that'd be trickier, but you could call a local graduate psychology department and volunteer, since they need their students to learn how to administer and grade the tests anyway. It is expensive as hell normally.

If you're not currently insured, read this very carefully. Half of getting help from the state involves figuring out abso-fucking-lutely everything to match their criteria properly, because as much as one criterion off and they'll happily not sign you up. On the other hand, as a rule, you can often get help in wealthier states (I know California's currently broke, but I'm comparing it to Nebraska or Arkansas here — similarly, I'm from New Hampshire and Massachusetts, both of which were affluent enough to offer generous health subsidies) if you can cross your T's and dot your I's. (Note that the likelihood of the under-educated, impoverished people with serious difficulties in life that these programmes are meant to serve being able to do that is relatively low. If I were cynical, I'd say that's a deliberate choice to keep enrolment down. I'm cynical.)


"Sometimes I have queer thoughts", I love that one on the MMPI. Being gay, I never know how to answer that one.


I'd've totally stopped and asked the examiner, "Do you mean like leather bars here?" Of course, you'd end up dealing with the fall-out for months.


$cientology's personality test is essentially the MMPI.


Posted Image

Old but so relevant still.

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#10 dymphna

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 08:48 AM

You're told three unrelated words at the beginning of the session and will be asked them at the end (not as easy as it sounds)

Really? I remembered those for months.


Well, sure -- I still remember basketball and ladder! But I don't know what the LAST one was! And that damn test was in 2005.


d


come to think of it - basketball and ladder are related - WTF?
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Yes, my name really is Dymphna.

 

I'm not a doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or therapist.

I can find you an answer and I won't blow smoke up your ass.

 

St. Dymphna is the Patron for brain maladies.

 

I'm the Enforcer.

 

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#11 Her

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 09:09 AM


You're told three unrelated words at the beginning of the session and will be asked them at the end (not as easy as it sounds)

Really? I remembered those for months.


Well, sure -- I still remember basketball and ladder! But I don't know what the LAST one was! And that damn test was in 2005.


d


come to think of it - basketball and ladder are related - WTF?


Pencil, tree, necklace, October 2000.

Maybe I don't know enough about basketball to get this, but how are basketballs and ladders related?
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Give us this day our daily meds:150 mgs lamotrigine, 75 mgs topiramate, 150 mgs Seroquel XR, 100 mgs Seroquel IR, 12.5 mgs Ambien CR, 15 mgs escitalopram, 4000 i.u. Vit. D3. Azelastine spray for allergies.

Cyclobenzaprine and Midrin PRN.

Past, failed attempts: Effexor XR, Celexa, amitriptyline, Depakote, Geodon, klonopin, ativan, bupropion, busipirone, lithium, trazodone, Lunesta, Rozerem, gabapentine, mirtazapine, Wellbutrin, Temazepam, Sonata.

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#12 dymphna

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 09:40 AM

Dymphna,

Word to the wise on the MMPI - and this is going to sound so obvious, don't laugh - answer only the questions that APPLY to you, not the questions you know the ANSWER to.


So all of the little fail safes that are written into the MMPI to make sure a person isn't "gaming" it - well, I was consistent in my answers. I wasn't gaming it, I was just consistent in what I "knew".


Can you give an example of a question that would demonstrate how you would differentiate between what "applies" to you and what you "know"? I'm a little confused.



What APPLIES to you is what you, yourself, have personally experienced. I know, that doesn't make it any clearer.

It happened to your body. (You were assaulted, you saw someone murdered, you had a terrible accident)

It occurs in your brain. (Mania, depression, dissociation, hallucinations, voices, psychosis, night terrors, seizures, migraines)

You experienced a significant emotional event. (this is subjective: one person's kitten dying is equivalent to another person's best friend jumping in front of a train)


compared to


What you KNOW -- which could be...

-- that people may have a difficult time coping when they've had significant trauma happen to THEM (because you SAW it in some of your FRIENDS)

-- that an increase in sex drive doesn't necessarily mean that a person is manic, just because one of the hallmarks of mania is sexual promiscuity (because you read it HERE and a hundred other places). Sometimes, it's just because a person lost 20 lbs and feels like a hot babe.


I realize that those are kind of crappy examples. I have actually read stories by people who honestly believe that X has happened to them, when, in truth, it happened to a friend, a sibling, a parent, etc. It's not even a Munchausen's by proxy - they see it as a backblast trauma that is every bit as damaging, if not more, than what happened to the original recipient. Never realizing that it falls under what they KNOW, not what APPLIES. Fine distinction. Took me a lot of years to figure it out.


Dymphna
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Yes, my name really is Dymphna.

 

I'm not a doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or therapist.

I can find you an answer and I won't blow smoke up your ass.

 

St. Dymphna is the Patron for brain maladies.

 

I'm the Enforcer.

 

eqnmrt.jpg

 


#13 dymphna

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 09:41 AM



Well, sure -- I still remember basketball and ladder! But I don't know what the LAST one was! And that damn test was in 2005.


d


come to think of it - basketball and ladder are related - WTF?


Pencil, tree, necklace, October 2000.

Maybe I don't know enough about basketball to get this, but how are basketballs and ladders related?


I have a weird brain.


d
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Yes, my name really is Dymphna.

 

I'm not a doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or therapist.

I can find you an answer and I won't blow smoke up your ass.

 

St. Dymphna is the Patron for brain maladies.

 

I'm the Enforcer.

 

eqnmrt.jpg

 


#14 martasi2

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 10:49 AM




Well, sure -- I still remember basketball and ladder! But I don't know what the LAST one was! And that damn test was in 2005.


d


come to think of it - basketball and ladder are related - WTF?


Pencil, tree, necklace, October 2000.

Maybe I don't know enough about basketball to get this, but how are basketballs and ladders related?


I have a weird brain.


d


"Step right up folks! There she is, the Woman with the Weird Brain!" [crowd is shocked, makes EEUU and AAH noises, women faint, children run away]
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#15 dymphna

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 01:23 PM

Phhhtt!
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Yes, my name really is Dymphna.

 

I'm not a doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or therapist.

I can find you an answer and I won't blow smoke up your ass.

 

St. Dymphna is the Patron for brain maladies.

 

I'm the Enforcer.

 

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#16 jessica

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 06:22 AM

She was pretty freaked out (really) that I had this huge "suicide spike" — I don't know some test graphed a giant spike. Apparently she'd never seen it that bad. Maybe I'll get a tattoo of it or become a poster child for functional suicidal people.


My lady, I like the cut of your jib.

After it was all over, she advised me to go on meds (I was off), see a pdoc, see a tdoc, don't kill myself. Get used to the language/memory problems — can't fix them and they will probably get worse. Learn coping techniques. I actually don't do anything different because of the tests. It did give me an official disability, but what can I do with that? I knew my brain was f'd up. Now I have proof. But it didn't fix anything.


I suppose that should I walk the SSD road, the results may end up helping me in my case. If I have problems such as receptive language, I will be so completely not surprised. But again, I'm behind this out of curiosity and a desire to have my problems be as well-documented as possible, so a few more definitions won't hurt.
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#17 In_Remission_Allison

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Posted 27 September 2011 - 06:38 AM

Is it weird that I understand how basketballs and ladders are related? I just get the image of the basketball net and the ladder used to hang the net in my head and well...that's how they're related. Tall things.
I just it's weirder to ask if it's weird, at least in this forum.

#18 dymphna

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Posted 27 September 2011 - 07:31 AM

Is it weird that I understand how basketballs and ladders are related? I just get the image of the basketball net and the ladder used to hang the net in my head and well...that's how they're related. Tall things.
I just it's weirder to ask if it's weird, at least in this forum.


Yes.


D
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Yes, my name really is Dymphna.

 

I'm not a doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or therapist.

I can find you an answer and I won't blow smoke up your ass.

 

St. Dymphna is the Patron for brain maladies.

 

I'm the Enforcer.

 

eqnmrt.jpg

 


#19 VAL

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Posted 27 September 2011 - 08:23 PM

Jessica,

If you're not currently insured, read this very carefully. Half of getting help from the state involves figuring out abso-fucking-lutely everything to match their criteria properly, because as much as one criterion off and they'll happily not sign you up. On the other hand, as a rule, you can often get help in wealthier states (I know California's currently broke, but I'm comparing it to Nebraska or Arkansas here — similarly, I'm from New Hampshire and Massachusetts, both of which were affluent enough to offer generous health subsidies) if you can cross your T's and dot your I's. (Note that the likelihood of the under-educated, impoverished people with serious difficulties in life that these programmes are meant to serve being able to do that is relatively low. If I were cynical, I'd say that's a deliberate choice to keep enrolment down. I'm cynical.)


I don't qualify for medi-cal in California..can't speak to other states but in California you have to have been declared disabled, be over 65, blind, need kidney dialysis. I just know being poor and sick ain't gonna cut it. I got my brother on medi-cal (and this was years ago when the state still had some money) and on SSI and had to go before a judge. Also, you can't have anything above $2000...no car, house..nothing..your total assets can't be above $2000.

I had to apply for med-cal to get a free med from a pharma company...think it was abilify and BMS. I any case, I knew I'd be denied but had to produce the paperwork saying I was denied and it was sort of funny...they declared me "medically indigent" and then went on to explain that in California, the medically indigent don't qualify for medi-cal.

It's different if you're pregnant or have a family, but straight medi-cal is hard to get on .

I think a lot of the poor and sick who do get on SSI and so on, have advocates to fill out the paperwork and sometimes it's social workers from the clinic or hospital where they were treated because getting them on public assistance can help the clinic or hospital get paid back for any treatment given...that it how it was with getting a friend on medi-cal and declared disabled. I did all of my brother's paperwork.
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#20 VAL

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Posted 27 September 2011 - 08:26 PM

Jessica,

../../../public/style_images/master/snapback.pngVAL, on 21 September 2011 - 02:56 PM, said:

I'm also an incredibly cautious person about many things and other than occasional impulsive purchases that at that time were never more extreme than, "I shouldn't have spent that $100 on that book" …


It's a book. That's not impulsive, that's a bibliophile's dream.


Ah yes...the good old days when I had a real job and buying a $100.00 book was nothing.
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#21 junky69

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 07:27 PM

Sorry- I just had to laugh reading this.
I just had the psycho crap last week for the first time. It was about 36 hrs after a 4 hr sz. It was during a VEEG which I had began (Mon) after 2 days of sleeping very little so that I would get the flopping done & me out the door ASAP. So I was pretty "out of it" when I got there to begin w/. I watched T.V. untl 4 A.M the first night there & by (Tue) evening the SZ began. The test had been planned for the following A.M., but I laughed & told them "best of luck", since the drugs had been lowered, the SZ was long & the brain fried. Well, it remained until Sat. They had the test on Thursady A.M.. During the 7 hrs of the test the aura remained active so I didn't even attempt to make sense of anything. It just wasted my time & gave me a constant headache.
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#22 Mr Stewart

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 06:42 PM

Interesting thread. I haven't done one of these but am scheduled in for the full gamut later this month. Was nervous about it. Still am, but now reading this and having some idea of what the process will entail is helpful. They gave me a very general overview (2 hour interview, some pen and paper tests, maybe some other stuff over the course of two 7 hour appointments). I didn't ask for more information, partly because I think it might be better the less I know. The more I know, the more I'll be thinking about how my answers may be interpreted, and the more I may be inclined the give less than honest answers.

I think I will bring a piece of paper with me that says BE HONEST in bright green letters. :/

I guess I'll come back to this thread and post how it went when it's over.

Edited by Mr Stewart, 01 July 2012 - 06:43 PM.

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#23 lavender

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 08:07 PM

I am supposed to have one of these scheduled as well. I had the one hour interview a couple weeks ago. Right now I'm waiting on insurance approval. It didn't occur to me that insurance might not approve it.
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#24 jangev

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 06:42 PM

"Sometimes I have queer thoughts", I love that on on the MMPI. Being gay I never know how to answer that one !


HAH!

The MMPI is full of ambiguous questions, archaic language, and is so redundant that I gave up after a certain point.


haha, i specified little details to clarify my answer if i felt the question(s) was unclear and my answer would be misunderstood. it was getting annoying after a while.

Edited by SirAmen, 03 July 2012 - 06:45 PM.

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also had unilateral and bilateral ECT series in '11

inaddition to rx: Vitamin B-complex 50, Vitamin E, Vitamin C, Vitamin B12, Co-Q10, DHA (fish oil)


#25 Rane

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Posted 04 July 2012 - 07:24 AM

Two disclosures. One, I had a neuropsych test after a dangerous manic episode and we wanted to know if I'd harmed my brain. It turned out to be a ridiculous evaluation because we don't know my scores before the episode. Then during the blocks and drawing, etc., I was so self-conscious and nervous that they concluded I have ADHD. I don't. I just have wild anxiety when somebody watches me draw, among other things.

The second disclosure is that besides BP1, I probably have BPD, and I knew they were testing my level of honesty and manipulation. The MMPI has questions that are basically testing honesty. So when I *manipulated* the test by answering honestly -- even if it implied something bad -- I got kuddos for being honest. There were questions about the respecting the flag and "have you ever taken something that didn't belong to you" or "lied to your boss" -- that sort of of thing. Questions like "have you ever heard voices" were complicated and I don't remember how I answered.

I scored 100% in honesty, and fair/middling points in building with blocks and drawing, although they couldn't determine why I'm not a genius.

All I learned is that I test well, am okay-smart, and obviously faked my way through graduate school.

Edited by Rane, 04 July 2012 - 07:31 AM.

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Lithium (0.9 @ 750mg/day), Lamotrigine (400mg/day), Levoxyl (88 mcg), Lorazapam (prn).

Fails: amitriptyline, zoloft, prozac, wellbutrin, depakote

#26 Mr Stewart

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 05:08 PM

Okay, did the whole shebang last week. Was about 90 minute interview and something in the area of seven hours worth of tests. Interview was the same as previous assessment interviews I have had. Same questions mostly, maybe a bit more specific on some stuff. As far as I know, I was being tested for autism spectrum, some flavour of social phobia or disorder, there was an OCD specific questionnaire in there as well, and then the depression questions I've answered several times before (different doctors). As far as I can recall, these are the tests I took:

day 1
-an IQ test with the blocks, the shapes, word association, word definitions, simple math etc.
-repeat strings of numbers back to the interviewer in various orders. In order as said, in order backwards, in numerical order low to high
-one very long multiple choice (might have been true/false?) test that covered a lot of mental disorder type stuff. Seemed to consist of about 50 questions phrased and asked in several different ways. 250-300 questions total I think.
-OCD inventory
-social anxiety and phobia questionnaire
-couple more pen and paper tests along these lines

day 2
-another questionnaire that I'm not certain the purpose of. Asked many creepy questions about past legal history (I don't have any history like that). A lot of "When you were under the age of 15 did you...?" and fill in the '...' with all manner of horrible things. I did not appreciate this test. Really made me uncomfortable.
-connect the dots with letters, numbers and letters + numbers in order on a large sheet of paper (this was weird, no idea the point of this one)
-how many animals can you name in 2 minutes? how many words that start with the letter S? how many words that start with the letter A? how many male names?
-People pictures tests. Many many of these. Listen to clip of spoken audio. Point to picture that best matches with the audio. Point to each photo and say what emotion (they gave me a list of seven to choose from) that particular person is displaying. Here is a grid of faces. memorize it. Now arrange it as best you remember. And do it again. And again. Answer some other questions and do it again once more. Here are several children, each has a name, each has an interest. Go through those repeatedly and try to remember the names and interests. Over and over. Many more tests along this same line of inquiry. I hated the faces and suspect I did very poorly on this portion.
-memory tests with words and pen drawings. Look at 50 drawings one by one and then go back and select between two drawings shown, A or B, which one did you see before? Same thing with 50 words.
-List of words, read and pronounce them as best you can to the interviewer. Interviewer appeared to be writing down my pronounciations phonetically as I did this.

that's all I can remember.

Won't find out the verdict for another couple weeks.

I had a bunch of word associations that I totally bombed. I actually got a little irritated when I had to explain why a bird was like a chair. A fucking bird is not like a chair.


Oh god the word associations. Those drove me crazy. Mouth and nose? I said, they're both body parts. Interviewers says, "can you be more specific?" No. Body parts. Are you sure? What? I don't know, they're... uh, they're both connected to the respiratory system??? *face meet palm* T___T

Edited by Mr Stewart, 04 August 2012 - 05:34 PM.

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#27 Blue Heron

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Posted 05 August 2012 - 09:02 AM

Thanks for the update, Mr Stewart. The word association part sounds like they were administering something akin to part of the SAT (or the old SAT, at least)! If it's any comfort, though, they were likely just trying to determine how your brain makes connections, not testing your IQ.
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"Note also how we don’t worry about taking medicine for pain the way we often do about taking 'happiness' pills like antidepressants. We worry that by artificially changing our mood we risk not being 'us.' But no one feels inauthentic because he took ibuprofen to relieve his back pain."

--"Happiness and Its Discontents," essay in the New York Times by Daniel M. Haybron, the author of the book, Happiness: A Very Short Introduction.

 

"What's your true self and what's your fake self. Yeah, and where are you on that scale? And how's it working for you? And sometimes you got to go with the fake one, and sometimes faking it 'til [you] make it is the best path, ... I mean sometimes for ... anybody I've known who's struggling ... you got to put your feet on the ground every day and say, you know, don't embrace the struggle, you're going to sink like a rock."

-- David O. Russell, the director of Silver Linings Playbook, in an interview with Terry Gross

(I took out most of the "you knows.")

 

 


#28 StrungOutOnLife

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 12:31 PM

 



Well, sure -- I still remember basketball and ladder! But I don't know what the LAST one was! And that damn test was in 2005.


d


come to think of it - basketball and ladder are related - WTF?


Pencil, tree, necklace, October 2000.

Maybe I don't know enough about basketball to get this, but how are basketballs and ladders related?

 


I have a weird brain.


d

Basketball was first played with peach baskets and you use a ladder to pick peaches...?


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#29 madcap

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 06:48 PM

Dymphna: "...everyone was scooting away from me like I belonged on the Group W bench."

 

Flawless.

 

 

 

Decided against neuropsych avenue.  Not going to tell me anything I don't already know.


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"Not today, mother******.  I have legs."  Allie, Hyperbole and A Half


#30 ctalk

ctalk

    DIY Trepanist

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  • Diagnoses:Bipolar II, GAD, Panic Disorder, Hypothyroidism
  • Current Meds:Lithium ER 750mg, Zoloft 25mg, Seroquel 25mg, Ativan PRN, Clonazepam PRN, Synthroid

Posted 27 September 2013 - 07:21 PM

Does anyone know whether this kind of testing is covered in Canada? Specifically by OHIP in Ontario? I'm on disability, so no insurance, but I think I'd really benefit from this kind of testing. Especially to test memory and cognitive function. I had 9 bilateral ECT treatments between late November 2012- early January 2013. My brain has been a wreck ever since and while some areas have improved, my progress has plateaued and I worry the damage is permanent.


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"Some are born mad. Some remain so."

-Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot

 

Past Meds:  Latuda, Moclobemide, Mirapex, Saphris, Depakote, Concerta, Modafinil, Tegretol, Abilify, Effexor, Lamictal, Imovane, Luvox, Wellbutrin, Trazadone, Clonazepam, Zyprexa, Celexa




Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: neuropsychology, neurology, diagnosis

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